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Lights! Christmas! Action!

by: Kirsten Land on December 4th, 2018 about General

It’s that time of year, and the holiday season is upon us. If you haven’t already, now is the time to hang the lights, blow up the snowmen, and really show your neighbors who has the most holiday spirit! But before you get started, here are a few things to remember.

1. Measure what you need

If you are in a new home or are planning different decorations than previous years, you will want to get out a tape measure and make sure you have what is necessary to fill the space. Look at where the lights will be hung and ask yourself what kind of clips would be best.

Maybe you want to wrap a tree or bush in lights this year. A rule of thumb is 100 lights for every foot and a half of tree. So a six-foot-tall tree would need 400 lights on the strand. You could also invest in net lights for the bushes and shrubs and just drape the lights over the top.

2. Get the right color

Not all lights look the same. White LED bulbs tend to shine blue while white incandescent bulbs look more yellow. Match what you already have if you need to buy more. You can also mix the color of lights you’re hanging. For example, all the gutter lights on your home could be white icicle lights while all the trees or bushes are multicolored.

3. Safety

This is probably the most important tip. Stay safe!

  • Follow proper safety precautions when using a ladder.
  • When using lights outdoors, only use lights rated for outdoor use. It should be clearly marked on the packaging.
  • Aways use UL-approved extension cords for outdoor use. Never use any lights or cordage with fraying or exposed wires.
  • Turn off your lights during the day and when you’re out of town.

When putting your design together, go into it with a plan. Start at a focal point, like the front door or the walkway leading to it, and spread out evenly from there. Don’t forget to have fun with it!

If you notice any potential issues on your roof while you are decorating, give us a call at 405-359-3951 or send an email to info@landroofingokc.com for a free inspection or estimate.

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Roofing in a winter wonderland

by: Kirsten Land on November 20th, 2018 about Land Enterprises Roofing

With snow, ice, wind, and rain all stacking up against your roof in the winter months, you may need some repairs or even a full roof replacement. Weather extremes can lead to cracking, peeling, and leaks, and minor issues can become bigger issues quickly when it’s cold.

The good news is that it’s entirely possible to fix roof issues during the upcoming cold weather with these considerations in mind.

Temperature

The ideal setting for replacing shingles is above 50 degrees Fahrenheit. Shingles stick together by way of a thermal activated strip of adhesive. If the weather is not warm enough, each shingle may need adhesive to be manually applied to ensure a proper seal.

Thankfully, Oklahoma winters allow for some warmer days. A sunny winter day with a high in the 40s or 50s can allow shingles to heat up to 70 degrees or so from direct sunlight and rising heat from within the home.

Cold weather is not an ideal working condition, but it can happen when needed. Working on a roof already requires working with uneven footing and bulky equipment. Adding extra layers of clothing to stay warm lowers mobility even further. Thankfully, roofers have a little less work during winter which allows for more control of scheduling jobs on warmer days.

Expectations

Since roofing in the winter does require specific circumstances, there are defined guidelines for finishing a cold-weather project. Part of the Land Roofing process includes removing only the number of old shingles than can be replaced in a single day of work. That means your roof will never be unprotected during the installation process. Your roofing team would remove shingles in the morning, attach the underlayment, and set the shingles out on the roof to warm up for installation in the afternoon.

Sometimes the condition of a roof requires maintenance or replacement in the winter. The good news is you don’t have to wait three or four months for that to happen. If the weather’s too cold to start a full replacement job, we can help with a short-term repair to prevent further damage while we wait for temperatures to warm up.

If your roof needs attention, give us a call at 405-359-3951 or send an email to info@landroofingokc.com to set up a free roof inspection or estimate-even in the winter!

Posted in Land Enterprises Roofing       Comments: None

Choosing the right ladder for the job

by: Kirsten Land on November 6th, 2018 about General

Do you have a tall job ahead of you? Make sure you have the right equipment to get up to the task. The good news is there are plenty of styles and sizes of ladders to choose from.

Using the right tool for the job makes everything easier and safer. Be sure to keep these things in mind when choosing a ladder.

Style

Single-section ladders are the traditional, two-legged ladders that are placed on flat ground and leaned against a structure. They tend to be the lightest and longest ladders for any given size. Both legs should be placed on flat, solid ground, and the top of the ladder should lean forward one foot for every four feet of height. That means a twelve-foot ladder should be placed three feet away from the surface it’s leaned against.

The stepladder is basically a single-section ladder that has two extra legs built in to allow the ladder to stand on its own. Self-supporting ladders are great for changing lightbulbs or other jobs in open areas where there’s not a flat surface to lean the ladder against.

An extension ladder is basically a single-section ladder stacked on top of another single-section ladder. One ladder acts as the base while the other slides up and hooks into place to add extra height to the ladder.

Telescopic ladders are a convenient way to reduce storage space. It works, as it sounds, like the mechanism in a telescope or spyglass. Sections between each rung lock into place as they are pulled out of the larger section below it.

Articulated or multi-function ladders do it all. Multi-function ladders have locking joints that allow it to be used as a single-section ladder, a stepladder of varied angles, or a sawhorse that can be used as a support for scaffolding.

Size

Your ladder should be taller than where your feet need to be. In other words, you should be able to reach what you’re doing without being on the top step of your ladder. As soon as you are unable to grab the ladder or lean against it, you lose most of your stability and balance.

Extension ladders have a recommended stopping point of four rungs from the top. The top of the ladder should also extend at least three feet above the support holding the ladder up. Remember that the ladder is also being leaned forward which will reduce the total height.

Never stand on the top rung of a ladder! Always follow the instructions included with/on the ladder, such as the required overlap for extension ladders.

Strength

Ladders are rated for load capacity of bodyweight and any materials carried up the ladder. If a person weighs 200 pounds and carries 50 pounds of clothing, safety equipment, tools, and construction materials up the ladder with them, they will need a ladder that can support at least 250 pounds.

The strength scale is as follows, and every ladder should be clearly labeled with the type and weight limit:

  • Type III – 200 pounds
  • Type II – 225 pounds
  • Type I – 250 pounds
  • Type IA – 300 pounds
  • Tye IAA – 375 pounds

Material

Ladders are made of aluminum, steel, wood, or fiberglass, with varying strength and durability for each material. Wood and fiberglass do not conduct electricity and may be used around electrical cabling and equipment.

Ladders can bring you much closer to hard-to-reach places and help you accomplish necessary tasks, but they can also pose a significant risk of injury if used incorrectly. Be sure to follow all safety precautions when using a ladder and contact a professional when necessary.

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The basics of roof safety

by: Kirsten Land on October 16th, 2018 about Roofing Advice

The roof of your home or business wasn’t really designed with foot traffic in mind, which means climbing on it can be dangerous. If you do need to venture up on your roof for cleaning or maintenance, here are some basic safety tips to keep in mind.

Choose the right ladder

If you are going to use a ladder, use a sturdy ladder. Aluminum and fiberglass are popular options, but check the weight rating for any ladder you use. When the ladder is set up against the side of a house, it should extend at least three feet above the edge of the roof.

Do not climb on any rung above the edge of the roof, and keep both hands on the ladder as you make the transition onto the roof. Raise and lower tools after establishing yourself on the roof, not while climbing. These same actions in reverse will also help with making a safe descent.

Secure the ladder properly

A ladder is your link from roof to ground. It should be stable, which means all legs should be sitting flat on the ground to avoid rocking or slipping. A partner on the ground can help with stabilizing the ladder, as can tying off the ladder.

The angle of the ladder is an important part of set up and use. The general recommendation is that the bottom of the ladder should be one foot away from the roof for every four feet of ladder height. For example, a sixteen foot tall ladder should sit four feet away from the edge of a roof.

Avoid steep roofs

Steep roofs should be left to the professionals or those who know how to safely set up a roof harness system. If you are uncomfortable with a more shallow roof, harnesses and roof brackets are available for your use. Always follow instructions on installation and be sure the brackets are nailed into an actual truss or rafter.

Watch for other areas of risk

There are lots of areas of risk on a roof, so be sure to keep an eye out for these dangers anytime you are on a roof. Avoid stepping on any debris or impediments like leaves, branches, or tools. Be aware of any skylights and avoid stepping on them. Also watch out for edges and level splits that can be a tripping hazard. It’s also important to check the weather before getting on the roof to avoid high winds, rain, or lightning. Finally, keep in mind that lifting and working on a roof can lead to strains or other injuries.

For most people, getting on the roof is a rare occurrence, and those who are not properly trained or prepared should avoid it. It is better to seek the help of a qualified and experienced roofer rather than putting oneself at risk.

Posted in Roofing Advice       Comments: None

The winter-ready roof checklist

by: Kirsten Land on October 2nd, 2018 about General

Is your home ready for winter? Before the weather starts to get cold, it’s a good idea to take a look at the state of your roof. Snow, ice, and tree branches could be in the forecast for your roof.

Here are some simple steps to follow to see if the top of your house is in tip-top shape.

Clean it

The first step you can take is to clear your roof of any debris, leaves, and twigs. This keeps the gutters from filling up and causing damage to the siding from excess weight. Go ahead and clean out the gutters as well. When gutters fill up with debris, they can damage a home and create unnecessary hazards. In the winter months, rain, snow, and ice will be falling on the roof. When the precipitation runs over the gutter instead of down the drain, dangerous icicles can form along the edge of a roof.

Examine it

After the roof has been cleaned, take a close look to see if it has sustained any damage. Watch out for frayed edges, lifting and curling shingles and flashing, and any missing shingles or bare spots you think shouldn’t be there. These problem areas can allow leaks, and it’s best to repair them before major damage occurs.

Go ahead and check the surrounding area for any potential threats like dead branches or a high concentration of overhanging trees, too. Most Oklahomans know what happens to trees in an ice storm, so be sure to keep branches trimmed back away from your roof.

Tune it

It is about to be very cold outside, and you won’t want all that cold coming inside your home. Check that your vents are clear and that you have a well-insulated attic. Depending on what kind of insulation you have, your roof may need anywhere from 14 to 18 inches. Older homes tend to require more insulation as well, so it is important to get a professional opinion.

In addition to these steps, you should also learn about possible winter threats like ice dams, sideways rain, and strong winds. Ice dams cause a similar issue to clogged gutters, but in this case the gutter is full of ice and can cause leaks in your roof. Strong winds and sideways rain can lift up edges and allow water inside the roof.

If you are concerned about your roof, Land Enterprises Roofing offers a free roof inspection. We also offer preventative maintenance plans for both residential and commercial roofs. For more information, email info@landroofingokc.com.

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A covered roof vent is a dangerous roof vent

by: Kirsten Land on September 18th, 2018 about Residential Roofing

Pick a house in Oklahoma and look at its roof. Chances are you will see some big round whirly bird or turbine vents. These pinwheels are not for decoration-they are actually in place on your roof to make sure your home has proper and healthy air exchange.

Proper ventilation is important to the well-being of the actual materials your home is built from. Covering the ventilation system can lead to serious (and expensive) health problems for a home’s structure. Trust us when we say don’t cover your air vents.

In the summer, the vents let the rising hot air in your home escape. So it might seem like a good idea to trap the warm air inside during the winter months, but doing so is a mistake.

Even though you could go to a home supply store to buy relatively inexpensive covers in the winter, you shouldn’t. Trapping warm air in your attic can cause the moisture in the air to condensate. The excess moisture in your attic can lead to mold forming and growing inside the home. Warm air trapped in an attic can also lead to ice dams forming in gutters. Ice dams happen when the snow on a roof melts, runs off into the gutter, then refreezes. They can cause damage to both the gutters and the roof.

If you want to keep your home warm in the winter, try checking if you have proper insulation on the attic floor. This keeps the warm air in your house while still allowing for proper ventilation.

Covering attic vents also traps harmful chemicals, physical particulates, and unwanted moisture inside the home. It’s never a good idea to block the natural flow of air in your home. Again, proper ventilation leads to a healthy home!

If you would like more information on roof ventilation, read more from Energy Star. And if you think your roof may be in need of repair or replacement, contact us for information and to schedule a free roof inspection.

Posted in Residential Roofing       Comments: None

Subcontractor Spotlight: Jeff Birdwell

by: Kirsten Land on September 4th, 2018 about Land Enterprises Roofing

Land Enterprises Roofing is a roofing company and general contractor that helps clients with each and every aspect of their insurance claim. That means we spend a good amount of time working with all kinds of highly skilled subcontractors who can help us get the entire job done the best way possible.

Jeff Birdwell is one of those highly skilled subcontractors. As the owner and operator of Aqua-Flo Seamless Gutter Systems, he has been repairing and building gutters since 2004. We asked Jeff a few questions about the work he does and what else he enjoys doing.

What brought you to start your own guttering business?

My best friend owns and operates a rain guttering company in Dallas, TX. He recruited and trained me in the business in 2001. With his blessing, I ventured out and started Aqua-Flo in Edmond after the large hail storm hit Oklahoma City in 2004. I networked with many roofers and soon met Brian and Kirsten Land. I am truly blessed to be a preferred subcontractor for such amazing people.

What is the best part of your line of work?

I wouldn’t be honest if I didn’t say that being my own boss is the best part of my business. Managing my time so I can be around my family and my four-year-old daughter as much as possible is a great reward that I do not take lightly. I must also mention that my installers are an awesome part of my business. They are simply amazing. Without them, there wouldn’t be an Aqua-Flo.

I also have time for golf, golf, and more golf. That time management thing I mentioned really helps out here. Haha!

How is Aqua-Flo different?

I believe what sets Aqua-Flo apart from the rest is our customer-focused mindset. We will go above and beyond to ensure our clients are getting the best products, design, and installation in the gutter industry. We have a solid reputation and more than 2,000 happy homeowners who have entrusted us with their rain guttering needs.

What is the weirdest thing you’ve found stuck in someone’s gutter?

Besides the countless nerf and tennis balls we have pulled out of gutters, the strangest thing we found was a raccoon that got itself stuck in a downspout. We had just finished the installation a week prior when the homeowner called and said her gutters overflowed in the latest rain storm. We checked and rechecked our levels and were scratching our heads as to what could possibly be the problem when we heard a loud noise coming from the downspout. I’m glad to report neither myself nor the raccoon were injured during the removal process.

Posted in Land Enterprises Roofing       Comments: None

Summer home maintenance checklist

by: Kirsten Land on August 21st, 2018 about General

Summer is rapidly drawing to a close, which means it’s a good time to make sure you’ve completed your summer home maintenance tasks. Before we know it, fall will be here, which means cooler temperatures but shorter days. Take advantage of the extra sunlight now to complete these tasks.

Inspect and touch up exterior paint

Check any painted wood or siding on your home for chipping, peeling, or flaking. The typically dry weather makes it a good time to paint, although be sure to check the paint label for any restrictions on temperature or sun exposure during application. A fresh coat of paint can improve curb appeal and protect your home from weather exposure.

Wash your windows

As temperatures cool off in fall, you may want to open your windows to let in some sunlight and some air. You’ll enjoy that fresh air and sunlight even more with clean windows. Be sure to wash your window screens, too. After all, what good are clean windows if you’re still looking through a dirty screen?

Seal window and door drafts

A broken or missing seal around windows or doors lets summer heat and winter cold in your home, which means you’re paying more than you should for energy. Grab some caulk or weather stripping and increase the energy efficiency of your home.

Clean your dryer vent

It’s amazing the amount of lint that can get clogged in a dryer vent, but most people rarely clean them. A clogged dryer vent can increase drying time, increase the humidity in your home, and increase your risk of a house fire.

Check your roof for damage and clean any debris

As temperatures cool down, animals begin to seek shelter anywhere they can find it. And if the soffits or other areas of your roof are damaged, those critters are going to find their way into your attic. Check your roof for any damaged areas and clean any debris, or call us to ask about your roof maintenance plan so we can check it for you.

Enjoy the final days of summer!

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Any manufactured product has the possibility of having a defect. Think about the number of safety recalls on cars or the limited warranty that covers your kitchen appliances in case of a manufacturer’s defect. The products used in roofing are no different. Sometimes, defects happen.

The roofing materials we use are all covered with a manufacturer’s warranty. We’re even required to attend trainings and be certified in their installation process to ensure that we’re installing the roof correctly. But even with correct installation, sometimes problems show up later that are tied back to an issue with the product. That’s why there’s a warranty on the materials.

So what’s the process when a manufacturer’s defect occurs? Well, first we’ll tell you that it’s sometimes a bit of a long process. If you suspect something’s wrong with your roof, contact your roofing company and the manufacturer right away to report the issue. It’s important to note that the warranty is between the homeowner and the manufacturer. The roofing company is involved in the process, too, but some manufacturers want to hear directly from the homeowner at each step of the process.

Time is especially critical if you’re selling a home, as the replacement process may take longer than the closing process and could interfere with the sale. The normal time frame for a warranty roof replacement is between 30 and 45 days, but we’ve also seen it take longer than that.

The first step in the process is the manufacturer sends a representative to inspect the roof. They look at the shingles, check to ensure there’s proper ventilation on the roof, and verify that everything was installed correctly. They might also take a shingle to analyze more carefully to try and figure out exactly what went wrong with the material.

Once the manufacturer confirms that it was a defect in the material, they’ll authorize the replacement roof and will work with the roofing company to provide materials and pay them for labor. The manufacturer will send you some paperwork to sign, and then the shingles will be shipped to your home. Be sure to keep an eye out for that paperwork and return it promptly, because shingles won’t be shipped until the company receives the paperwork.

As soon as the shingles arrive, the process is pretty similar to any roofing project where we remove the old roof in small sections, replace the necessary layers of the roof, and then ensure the job site is cleaned thoroughly of any nails or roofing debris.

Another important thing to note about roof warranties is that they’re often transferable to a new owner but you usually only get one transfer. If you’re buying a house, be sure to ask about the roof warranty and what company installed the current roof. If you’ve had a new roof installed, be sure to complete any paperwork to register the warranty and ensure you’re covered.

Posted in Residential Roofing, Roofing Advice       Comments: None

Subcontractor spotlight: C.J. Swickey

by: Kirsten Land on July 17th, 2018 about Land Enterprises Roofing

As a roofing company and general contractor that handles every aspect of your insurance claim, we work with a lot of talented subcontractors who handle things like fencing, gutters, painting, and much more. It’s all part of restoring your home to its pre-damage condition, and we wouldn’t be able to do that for our customers without our trusted subcontractors.

Today, we want to introduce you to C.J. Swickey, owner of New Creations Painting. He has done interior and exterior paint for us on many jobs, and he also does custom woodworking and home remodeling projects for customers.

What drew you to your business and your line of work?

I grew up remodeling and building houses with my parents. Later in life I did a lot of work on my own house and everyone kept asking me why I hadn’t started a business doing it. Until then I thought everyone grew up doing this type of work on their house and knew how to do it. I didn’t realize that people needed home remodeling as a service. So, I decided to take what I loved doing and turn it into a business, and now I’ve been doing it for twelve years.

What is your favorite part of your business?

Honestly? I like payday. Anyone who owns a business and says their favorite part is not payday is not telling the truth. But my next favorite part is seeing the transformation of a house from outdated to new and current. I especially love when the homeowners go out of town and we get to do a reveal for them and see the looks on their faces.

What makes your company unique?

I would say the most unique thing about what we do is the fact that we go beyond basic job training for our employees. They are apprentices until they have a good understanding of what they are doing and how the whole project comes together. We also train employees on personal finance and communication skills to help them in all aspects of their life.

A few people even started their own companies after training with us. Many would think that would be a bad thing, but we see it as a compliment. In this day and age when many contractors are unskilled and make us all look bad by being less than honest, we welcome newcomers who have skill and integrity and know how the project should run. There’s plenty of work out there for all, and it’s nice to have other contractors in the business who know what they are doing and will do quality work for a fair price.

We also now have a low-mess system for refinishing popcorn ceilings that utilizes a HEPA vac system to remove the popcorn from the ceiling and bag it. This allows us to keep the dust to an extreme minimum in a house, which is a huge improvement over the old way of popcorn ceiling removal.

What do you do outside of New Creations Painting?

I volunteer to work natural and man-made disaster sites all over the world and am certified in the USA and in Israel. I am certified as a suicide intervention instructor and am certified in critical incident stress management (CISM). CISM skills come into use almost daily.

I own one of only two certified organic Aquaponics system in Oklahoma, which combines raising fish and raising plants in the same water system. We are also working with partners to take this system into third-world countries and low-income areas in the United States to help with their need of water and soil conservation when growing food.

Posted in Land Enterprises Roofing       Comments: None

Oklahoma Roofing Contractor: Registration #80000030

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