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When should you replace roof insulation?

by: Kirsten Land on September 3rd, 2019 about Residential Roofing

Your home needs insulation. It is part of what goes into making a home comfortable to live in. If you want to have a healthy house, you will need to know a little bit about insulation or at least when you should go about replacing old materials.

Energy costs

In basic terms, insulation in a roof or attic helps your home hold in warm air in the winter and blocks out hot air in the summer. Not only does this make your home stay at the right temperature, but it also keeps your heat and A/C from working too hard and raising your energy bill.

If you always seem to be running up a large tab with the energy company, check and see if your appliances are constantly running. It may be a sign that they are having to work too hard due to inefficient insulation. One way to tell for sure is to have an HVAC professional run an energy audit on your home. 

What's in the attic?

Maybe a more obvious reason to replace insulation is when an animal has worked its way inside your attic. Rodents especially are great at making a big mess by tearing up insulation and leaving droppings all over the place.

Mold and mildew are high on the list of signs you need to replace insulation as well. If insulation is not working properly, an attic can store moist air rather than circulating it, leaving a home collecting water and growing harmful substances like mold.

Both mold and animals in the attic can be the cause of mysterious allergies or breathing issues. 

How much insulation to have

Insulation has a measurement for its resistance to allow heat flow through called an r-value. So if you have cellulose insulation with an r-value per inch of 3.5, you will need at least 11 inches of insulation to meet the minimum recommendation of R-38 for your home's attic. The recommended r-value divided by the r-value per inch of your insulation will tell you how many inches you need. Of course, a roofing professional can help you determine the right amount for your home as well.

A great time to check your insulation is right now! Another opportunity is whenever you are getting roof work done. If you are going to be checking on the roof or attic, you might as well have a look at the insulation that's keeping your home running effectively. And if your home is 30-40 years old and you don't think the insulation has ever been replaced, look into having that done soon.

If you would like to learn more about roofing and our roof maintenance services, please call us at 405-359-3951.

Posted in Residential Roofing       Comments: None

Severe weather in Oklahoma is an unfortunate eventuality. Luckily, a high-quality roof that is maintained with proper upkeep has the ability to stand against rough conditions for a long time.

So what should you do if you are in an area recently hit by strong storms?

Inspection

If you suspect your roof has been damaged, the first thing you can do is go outside and take a look at it. Signs of damage you should look out for include damage caused by hail which may appear like scuffs or circles that are lighter or darker in color compared to your normal shingle color. You should also look for lifted shingles, missing shingles, tears, cracks, and so on. 

To be certain of any roof damage, contact your roofing professional and arrange a visit for them to inspect the health of your roof.

Prevention

It is possible to reduce the risks facing your roof. Take preventative measures when the weather is clear. You can start by pruning your trees of any dead branches and pick up any fallen branches as well. Look around for any litter that may have gathered on your property and throw it away. It's also a good idea to make sure you put away all toys, tools, and objects that could be picked up and thrown by high winds. 

Maintenance

Preventative maintenance is a major part of the Land Enterprises Roofing service experience. Our maintenance program includes thorough inspections and routine cleaning, clearing debris, and trimming back any limbs that could pose a threat to your roof. If you'd like to know more about each visit to maintain your roof, we do include a written report that covers every aspect of what was cleaned and cared for during our visit.

Insurance and warranties

Shingle warranties can last up to 50 years. The bad news is, warranties typically only cover imperfections and the manufacturers can choose to void a warranty if the roof owner cannot prove proper upkeep and maintenance.

You should have an insurance policy that covers your roof to avoid any surprise expenses. Read through your policy or talk to your agent to make sure you know whether or not you are covered for things like fire, hail, wind, and falling tree/branch damage. Don't forget to ask about a leaky roof as well.

Another added benefit of Land's services is that we will work with your insurance company if you need to file a claim. 

If you're ready to learn more about Land Enterprises Roofing services or have any of your questions answered, please call us at (405) 359-3951 or email us at info@landroofingokc.com.

Posted in Residential Roofing, Roofing Advice       Comments: None

How does wind damage a roof?

by: Kirsten Land on June 4th, 2019 about Commercial Roofing, Residential Roofing

 Wind is a well known destructive force in Oklahoma. But how exactly does strong wind damage your home’s roof? And what does it look like?

Severe weather can cause damage to a roof in two ways. One is by way of throwing debris up against the roof itself. Anything moving fast enough can remove shingles, cut into the roof, tear or puncture shingles, damage flashing, roofing cement, and so on. Heavy limbs and trees are notorious for inflicting damage during high winds. The other way wind causes damage is simply by lifting the roofing material up off of the home. This exposes the whole roof to moisture, rot, mold, and any other form of decay. 

How to spot wind damage

Some roofing materials have very high wind ratings. Regardless, you should check the status of your roof after the wind has risen over 50 mph. To inspect your roof, go outside and look for any missing shingles or torn, cracked, curled materials and obvious patches on all sections of your roof. You may even want to use binoculars to get a closer look, but be careful where you look on sunny days. 

Remember, your roof isn’t just the shingles or metal. It is made up of other things like the flashing that covers joints and sharp angles, gutters, chimneys, vents. Take a look at the entire roof.

Here’s what the damage can look like for the different components of your roof:

  • Shingles: curling or raised edges, rips and tears, missing chunks of asphalt on individual shingles, missing whole shingles
  • Metal: dents, obvious holes or gaps, rust, lifting
  • Wood: mold, moss, splitting, missing shingles
  • Flashing: tears, buckling around other damaged areas
  • Gutters: bending, sagging, leaking, missing sections, rust
  • Chimneys: leaning, flashing damage, cracks, missing bricks

Be sure to keep an eye out for water damage and stains outside or inside the home and attic as well. This could be a sign of leaks caused by damage you can’t otherwise see.

Of course, if you are suspicious of any damage, you should contact an expert as soon as possible. Please feel free to give Land Roofing a call at 405-359-3951 or send an email to info@landroofingokc.com.

Posted in Commercial Roofing, Residential Roofing       Comments: None

 Roof ventilation is an important and necessary part of your home’s functionality. Without proper ventilation, energy bills can rise and your home can be seriously damaged.

Ventilation in your attic allows air to pass in and out of your home. This keeps your home from getting too hot and from collecting too much moisture. The air should come in under the edges of the roof and exit through the exhaust vents on top of the roof. Unfortunately, many roofs do not have enough circulation and are hurting because of it.

Bad roof ventilation is not good for your wallet! Let's look at the two major problems it causes.

Too much heat

If hot air collects in the attic and has nowhere to go, it will start to warm up the home below it. In the summertime, this causes drastic increases to energy bills because the A/C will be running constantly. In a worst case scenario, your air conditioner could freeze or break from overuse. Too much heat can also begin to warp the wood framing from the top of the attic down to the walls and doorway in your home.

The outside of your home can also be hurt by the excess heat trapped inside. Shingles can be cooked by overheating, drastically shortening their lifespan. 

Too much moisture

If air is not allowed to pass through your roof system, moisture in the air will begin to collect and damage your home. Water can seep into the wood making it rot. It also promotes the growth of molds and algae that are harmful to the health of you, your family, and the construction materials making up your home.

When water condenses, it will start to run. And if it pools and runs into your insulation, it is damaged and becomes less effective. By the time you get to that point, you will have water damage that requires replacements and repairs in your attic, the roof, the walls, and possibly electrical systems if the condensation is extreme.

That's a lot of expense that could have been avoided with proper ventilation!

What to do

You need to have your roof and attic ventilation up to standard. If you have seen any of the warning signs, please contact us today. Call 405-359-3951 or email us at info@landroofingokc.com.

Posted in Commercial Roofing, Residential Roofing       Comments: None

What roofing material is most energy efficient?

by: Kirsten Land on April 16th, 2019 about Residential Roofing

 You can have a roof covered by asphalt shingles, metal, slate, clay tiles, and more. But which material is the most energy efficient? If solar tiles or a “green” roof are allowed by your homeowner’s association, they may be able to offset energy costs while working to protect your roof. 

However, there are other ways to save on energy when it comes to your roof. 

Types of roofing material

  1. Shake (wooden) shingles – Shake shingles are durable as far as high wind and strong storms are concerned, but they may rot if they absorb too much moisture.
  2. Asphalt shingles – Asphalt shingles, which are the most popular choice, have been some of the least efficient systems in the past. But as technology progresses, so does the efficiency of these shingles.
  3. Metal – A metal roof is lightweight, reflective, and lasts a long time, but it can be easily dented by hail and debris and may get annoying to replace since it’s installed in large sections.
  4. Slate – Slate is naturally occurring like clay but is more durable.
  5. Tile (clay or concrete) – Clay tile is very energy efficient, but it’s better suited to dry climates because it tends to absorb water. Clay tile will also shatter when struck by hail in cold weather.
  6. White TPO, PVC, or elastomeric coatings – These coatings for commercial roofs are very reflective and can increase the lifespan of a roof.

The basics of energy efficient roofing

A roof is efficient when it reflects the sun’s radiation and blocks out heat. Different materials do this in different ways. A metal roof will get extremely hot under the summer sun, but underneath the surface, the roof remains cool because of the metal’s reflectivity. 

In contrast, a concrete roof will not reflect as well as a metal roof, but the material itself will remain relatively cool and not allow the home to absorb extra heat. 

Currently, the more energy efficient roofs are made of slate, clay, or metal. But asphalt shingles are now being made with more reflective composites, which increases their energy efficiency.

Choosing an energy efficient roof

If you’re debating your options for an energy efficient roof, ask your roofer for their recommendation! We have seen countless roofs over the years and are well-equipped to answer that question. 

Ask your roofer, “What is the best roofing material for me?” Where you live, the style of your home, and your budget will all impact the answer to that question. 

If you have any further questions about roofing, feel free to get in contact by calling 405-359-3951 or emailing us at info@landroofingokc.com.

Posted in Residential Roofing       Comments: None

Roof damage can be more than just shingles

by: Kirsten Land on March 19th, 2019 about Residential Roofing

 It’s important to monitor the condition of your roof, as small areas of damage can quickly become major problems. If there’s been severe weather in your area recently, it’s a good idea to get your roof checked.  

Even if there hasn’t been severe weather, a regular inspection from a qualified roofing company can help keep your roof in great shape. Here are a few things we look for when taking preventative measures.

Cleaning

Your yard and roof should be clear of any twigs, leaves, branches, and anything else that could potentially clog up a gutter. Loose debris can also cause damage to a roof when blown around by very strong winds. 

Shingles

Shingles can be damaged in a multitude of ways: curling, cupping, flaking, tearing, splitting, and blistering. Basically, watch out for any shingles that don’t look normal. If an edge has lifted, the corners are curling up off the roof, or anything looks like it is broken, that area’s effectiveness may be compromised.

Roof vents and beyond

Your roof is made up of more than just the shingles. Roof vents can also become damaged or rusted and allow water to seep into your home. Areas where the roof level changes can also be a source of leaks if damaged. Any teeth marks, scratches, or holes in your housing material are signs of an animal taking up residence.

Maintenance 

Land Enterprises Roofing offers preventative maintenance for both commercial and residential roofing. Twice a year, we will inspect your roof for any signs of damage. With a regular inspection and routine maintenance, you can ensure the good health of your roof. 

There are things you can do yourself to make sure your roof is safe, but ultimately, a professional roofer that you trust should take a look if you suspect any damage has occurred.

For more information regarding roofing, inspections, and maintenance, please contact us as info@landroofingokc.com or call 405-359-3951.

Posted in Residential Roofing       Comments: None

What if your roof didn’t just protect your house but also helped power it? That's the idea behind the solar roof, an innovation that's slowly starting to catch on in the United States.

Solar panels on the roof are not a new idea-they've been around for years. But recently some companies are working to make the solar roof more accessible. Solar shingles are a new development that help a solar roof look much more like a regular roof as compared to bulky solar panels.

What are solar shingles?

Solar shingles, also known as “building-integrated photovoltaics” or BIPVs, are designed to make solar roofs more cost-effective and more unobtrusive. There are a few different options on the market from companies like CertainTeed, Forward, SunTegra, and Atlantis. They all function on the same general principle though.

Though some manufacturers have toyed with other technologies, most of the solar shingles are made up of silicon solar cells. Shingles tend to be slightly less energy-efficient than the equivalent square footage in panels, mainly because no air can circulate under the solar cell. They have the benefit of blending in with the regular roof though. Some (including CertainTeed's) can be installed directly onto roofing felt, while others go on top of an existing roof.

What other solar roof options exist?

There are some manufacturers who offer other solar options, too. These include both fixed and flexible solar panels. These are usually slightly cheaper than solar shingles, but they need to be installed on top of an existing roof and directly screwed to the rafters or trusses.

Is it worth the cost?

The answer to that question depends on where you live. Solar roofs are not cheap-they usually come in between three and six dollars a watt. In some states like Massachusetts and California, there are tax credits and incentives that can help offset the cost. There is a 30 percent federal income tax incentive that applies anywhere as well.

Once they're installed, though, they can be surprisingly durable. Most solar tile companies offer a warranty between 25 and 30 years, with some offering an even longer warranty.

If a solar installation were to be damaged by a hail or wind storm, it should be covered by insurance, but it's worth checking with your insurance agent before investing in a solar roof.

Solar roofs in Oklahoma

Land Enterprises Roofing offers solar roof installations for CertainTeed, and we personally have a backup solar system at our house. Here in Oklahoma where wind and sun are common commodities, renewable energy can cut your bills back by a fair amount. In the case of an ice storm or tornado that knocks power out for a couple of days, a solar roof can be a nice alternative to a generator.

If you'd like to learn more about solar roofs, there's an excellent piece on EnergySage that lays out the basics. Interested in discussing a solar roof? Call 405-359-3951 or send an email to info@landroofingokc.com, and we can see if a solar roof is the right fit for you.

Posted in Residential Roofing, Roofing Advice       Comments: None

A covered roof vent is a dangerous roof vent

by: Kirsten Land on September 18th, 2018 about Residential Roofing

Pick a house in Oklahoma and look at its roof. Chances are you will see some big round whirly bird or turbine vents. These pinwheels are not for decoration-they are actually in place on your roof to make sure your home has proper and healthy air exchange.

Proper ventilation is important to the well-being of the actual materials your home is built from. Covering the ventilation system can lead to serious (and expensive) health problems for a home’s structure. Trust us when we say don’t cover your air vents.

In the summer, the vents let the rising hot air in your home escape. So it might seem like a good idea to trap the warm air inside during the winter months, but doing so is a mistake.

Even though you could go to a home supply store to buy relatively inexpensive covers in the winter, you shouldn’t. Trapping warm air in your attic can cause the moisture in the air to condensate. The excess moisture in your attic can lead to mold forming and growing inside the home. Warm air trapped in an attic can also lead to ice dams forming in gutters. Ice dams happen when the snow on a roof melts, runs off into the gutter, then refreezes. They can cause damage to both the gutters and the roof.

If you want to keep your home warm in the winter, try checking if you have proper insulation on the attic floor. This keeps the warm air in your house while still allowing for proper ventilation.

Covering attic vents also traps harmful chemicals, physical particulates, and unwanted moisture inside the home. It’s never a good idea to block the natural flow of air in your home. Again, proper ventilation leads to a healthy home!

If you would like more information on roof ventilation, read more from Energy Star. And if you think your roof may be in need of repair or replacement, contact us for information and to schedule a free roof inspection.

Posted in Residential Roofing       Comments: None

Any manufactured product has the possibility of having a defect. Think about the number of safety recalls on cars or the limited warranty that covers your kitchen appliances in case of a manufacturer’s defect. The products used in roofing are no different. Sometimes, defects happen.

The roofing materials we use are all covered with a manufacturer’s warranty. We’re even required to attend trainings and be certified in their installation process to ensure that we’re installing the roof correctly. But even with correct installation, sometimes problems show up later that are tied back to an issue with the product. That’s why there’s a warranty on the materials.

So what’s the process when a manufacturer’s defect occurs? Well, first we’ll tell you that it’s sometimes a bit of a long process. If you suspect something’s wrong with your roof, contact your roofing company and the manufacturer right away to report the issue. It’s important to note that the warranty is between the homeowner and the manufacturer. The roofing company is involved in the process, too, but some manufacturers want to hear directly from the homeowner at each step of the process.

Time is especially critical if you’re selling a home, as the replacement process may take longer than the closing process and could interfere with the sale. The normal time frame for a warranty roof replacement is between 30 and 45 days, but we’ve also seen it take longer than that.

The first step in the process is the manufacturer sends a representative to inspect the roof. They look at the shingles, check to ensure there’s proper ventilation on the roof, and verify that everything was installed correctly. They might also take a shingle to analyze more carefully to try and figure out exactly what went wrong with the material.

Once the manufacturer confirms that it was a defect in the material, they’ll authorize the replacement roof and will work with the roofing company to provide materials and pay them for labor. The manufacturer will send you some paperwork to sign, and then the shingles will be shipped to your home. Be sure to keep an eye out for that paperwork and return it promptly, because shingles won’t be shipped until the company receives the paperwork.

As soon as the shingles arrive, the process is pretty similar to any roofing project where we remove the old roof in small sections, replace the necessary layers of the roof, and then ensure the job site is cleaned thoroughly of any nails or roofing debris.

Another important thing to note about roof warranties is that they’re often transferable to a new owner but you usually only get one transfer. If you’re buying a house, be sure to ask about the roof warranty and what company installed the current roof. If you’ve had a new roof installed, be sure to complete any paperwork to register the warranty and ensure you’re covered.

Posted in Residential Roofing, Roofing Advice       Comments: None

Roofing is an industry that involves some risk of injury, whether that’s from falling off a ladder, getting injured when tearing off or putting on a roof, suffering a dog bite on a job, or some other injury. So what happens if a roofer (or any other contractor) gets hurt at your house?

You might be thinking, “Well, that’s not my fault.” But if the roofing company or other contractor doesn’t have the proper insurance in place, that worker could end up suing you to cover the cost of their healthcare and lost wages.

That’s why it’s important to make sure any company you hire to work on your home is properly insured. But what does that really mean? First, there are two types of insurance they should carry-workers’ compensation and general liability.

Worker's compensation

Workers’ compensation is what covers an employee who gets injured on the job. Accidents happen, even to people who focus heavily on safety. Workers’ compensation by the employer takes care of the medical bills in the event of an accident, which means a worker is far less likely to sue you as the homeowner to cover the cost of medical treatment.

General liability

The second type of insurance is general liability. It’s a broader coverage that protects you and your home. Let’s say an employee gets injured by falling from the roof and through the ceiling of your living room. Not only is the employee injured, but your home is damaged. While that repair may be pretty basic for the company to fix, more significant damage can happen, whether from an electrical contractor who starts a fire in your home or a rainstorm that pops up right as we tear off your roof.

If the contractor doesn’t have general liability insurance or enough cash to cover the cost of the repairs, you may end up filing a homeowner’s claim to cover that damage. If that were to happen, that contractor would probably go out of business, but you’re still stuck with the bill.

How do you check?

So how do you know if someone’s properly insured? In the state of Oklahoma, you can check their Construction Industries Board (CIB) number and ensure they’re in good standing. The CIB regularly verifies both workers’ compensation and general liability insurance for registered companies, so if they have a CIB number and are in good standing, their insurance should be sufficient.

The other option is to ask the company for proof of their insurance. If they refuse to show you paperwork to prove their insurance coverage, it’s probably time to find a new contractor. The industry standard for general liability coverage in roofing is a minimum of $1 million, although many roofers (including Land Enterprises Roofing) carry more than that.

Some trades are heavily regulated and must prove their level of insurance to a board of some kind, but other trades don’t have any regulation at all. We require the same level of insurance from all of our subcontractors to ensure both their employees and our customers are protected at all times.

Before a contractor does any work on your home, be sure to verify their level of insurance so you’re not facing a legal battle with an injured employee.

Posted in Residential Roofing, Roofing Advice       Comments: 1

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