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What goes under shingles?

 The outer layer of your roof is just the first line of defense against light, heat, rain, and whatever else nature throws your home’s way. There is much more going on up there than just some asphalt tiles nailed to the top of a house.

Let’s take a look at what is under the shingles you see.

Rafters

The first layer of the roof is actually the rafters. This wooden framing acts as the foundation for everything that goes into making a good roof. Roof insulation can actually be placed between the beams to help keep your home warm in the winter and cool in the summer.

Deck

The next layer is the deck, or sheathing. A deck in roofing is a layer of plywood that creates the base for all the protective elements that make up a roof. So the rafters hold up the deck and the deck holds everything to the rafters.

Underlayment

The stuff you don’t see is often the most important. Shingles and other roofing materials are great protective tools, but before they can be attached to the surface of your roof, a temporary protective layer that will act as a second defense against nature needs to be laid down first. Commonly called felt, this is a layer of very durable paper or paper-like material coated in asphalt that works like shingles but comes in much larger sheets with many fewer gaps. 

Shingles

Finally, the outer layer is what you see. Your shingles or metal or tiles not only look beautiful on your home, but also act as the durable, long-lasting shield that will keep unwanted moisture and heat outside.

Vents and flashing

These four layers aren’t the only things that go into making a proper roof. Every roof should have adequate ventilation to allow dry air in and keep moist air out.

Shingles and underlayment aren’t enough to prevent rain and other forms of moisture from infiltrating your home. That’s why sheets of metal flashing are placed along edges like at the base of a chimney, at level changes in your roof, or around the edges of a vent. 

Do you have more questions concerning the health and status of your roof? Would you like to know more about how Land Roofing can help you take care of your home? Then please feel free to visit our website or contact us at 405-359-3951.

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