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What roofing material is most energy efficient?

by: Kirsten Land on April 16th, 2019 about Residential Roofing

 You can have a roof covered by asphalt shingles, metal, slate, clay tiles, and more. But which material is the most energy efficient? If solar tiles or a “green” roof are allowed by your homeowner’s association, they may be able to offset energy costs while working to protect your roof. 

However, there are other ways to save on energy when it comes to your roof. 

Types of roofing material

  1. Shake (wooden) shingles – Shake shingles are durable as far as high wind and strong storms are concerned, but they may rot if they absorb too much moisture.
  2. Asphalt shingles – Asphalt shingles, which are the most popular choice, have been some of the least efficient systems in the past. But as technology progresses, so does the efficiency of these shingles.
  3. Metal – A metal roof is lightweight, reflective, and lasts a long time, but it can be easily dented by hail and debris and may get annoying to replace since it’s installed in large sections.
  4. Slate – Slate is naturally occurring like clay but is more durable.
  5. Tile (clay or concrete) – Clay tile is very energy efficient, but it’s better suited to dry climates because it tends to absorb water. Clay tile will also shatter when struck by hail in cold weather.
  6. White TPO, PVC, or elastomeric coatings – These coatings for commercial roofs are very reflective and can increase the lifespan of a roof.

The basics of energy efficient roofing

A roof is efficient when it reflects the sun’s radiation and blocks out heat. Different materials do this in different ways. A metal roof will get extremely hot under the summer sun, but underneath the surface, the roof remains cool because of the metal’s reflectivity. 

In contrast, a concrete roof will not reflect as well as a metal roof, but the material itself will remain relatively cool and not allow the home to absorb extra heat. 

Currently, the more energy efficient roofs are made of slate, clay, or metal. But asphalt shingles are now being made with more reflective composites, which increases their energy efficiency.

Choosing an energy efficient roof

If you’re debating your options for an energy efficient roof, ask your roofer for their recommendation! We have seen countless roofs over the years and are well-equipped to answer that question. 

Ask your roofer, “What is the best roofing material for me?” Where you live, the style of your home, and your budget will all impact the answer to that question. 

If you have any further questions about roofing, feel free to get in contact by calling 405-359-3951 or emailing us at info@landroofingokc.com.

Posted in Residential Roofing       Comments: None

Why is my flat roof leaking?

by: Kirsten Land on April 2nd, 2019 about Commercial Roofing, Roofing Advice

 When a flat roof starts to leak, many people will simply think water is pooling on top of the building. But standing water is just one of many factors that can contribute to a leaky flat roof. 

That being said, it is a good idea to check for leaks and pooling water on a flat roof after heavy rains. As a roof settles and changes shape over time, the chances of standing water increase. Standing water puts extra pressure on the roof and deteriorates the roofing materials.

Many issues may result from a settling and aging roof: flashing leaks, buckling, or alligatoring. Yes, alligatoring.

Flashing

Flashing is the material used to seal off the area between any flat roof surface and any non-flat surface on the roof. Basically, it covers the gaps and cracks at the edges of things on your roof. Over time, a roof’s flashing may start to pull away, peel up, crack, or tear which can lead to leaks and moisture seeping into the building below.

Buckling

Buckling relates to the asphalt membrane of the roof, and it’s another issue that arises due to excessive movement from a settling roof over time. As a roof gets older, the asphalt membrane may wrinkle or buckle. A buckled roof is not a healthy roof, and it’s a sign that your roof needs maintenance.

Alligatoring

This happens when asphalt used on a roof wears out and starts to crack and bubble and take on an appearance that resembles the bumpy skin of an alligator. A roof alligator can’t bite you, but if you ignore the issue, it will certainly feel painful one way or another.

A professionally installed flat roof can last anywhere from 15 to 30 years. But there are obviously many factors that can impact the health of your roof. High amounts of rain, wind, ice, hail, and flying debris will eventually harm any roof. 

The best approach to prevent leaks in a flat roof is to monitor the status of your roof. If you are concerned by something you see as a potential problem, have leaking issues, want to start a maintenance program, or just have some questions, feel free to contact us for a consultation.

Posted in Commercial Roofing, Roofing Advice       Comments: None

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