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In the early years of Land Roofing Enterprises, we only offered roofing services. Brian did the labor along with roofing crews we hired. However, that created a challenge in managing the day-to-day duties of the business plus overseeing roofing crews plus estimating new jobs. Many other roofing companies were using subcontractors for their labor, so we decided to look into that option.

Helping with more than just the roof

As our business grew, clients also began asking for help with other aspects of their insurance claim, such as guttering, siding, windows, painting, and fencing. Our clients trusted us and valued the quality of service we provided. They wanted us to help them with more than just their roof.

We wanted to provide the highest quality of service to our clients, so we began developing relationships with companies who could provide the other services that often went along with an insurance claim. Instead of the customer having to work with multiple different companies on different pieces of the claim, we began offering a one-stop-shop approach to clients.

We communicated with the customer and their insurance company, and then we handled all of the subcontracting for other services. It made the process much easier for our busy clients!

That’s the business model we still use today. It’s a smart move for our business, since we can tap into different subcontractors as needed for specialty jobs or high-volume periods. Plus it’s the right thing to do for our clients.

Maintaining high standards

We have high standards for quality at Land Enterprises Roofing, and we expect those same high standards from all of our subcontractors.

We require that they hold a specific level of general liability insurance and worker’s comp insurance as well. That protects us and our clients, plus the subcontractor’s employees. We also stay in close communication with our subcontractors on any job to ensure they provide quality work. If a problem arises, we work with them to correct it and ensure we always meet the client’s expectations.

Many of our subcontractors have been working with us for a long time. Our roofing subcontractor has been working with us for more than a decade! We take good care of them and they take good care of us by providing the best possible service for our clients.

Roofing industry jargon and what it really means

by: Kirsten Land on March 6th, 2018 about Residential Roofing

Every industry has its own fair share of jargon, and the roofing industry is no exception. When we work with our customers, we do our best to explain all the different terms for products or parts of the roof so that it’s easily understandable.

Here’s a list of some common roofing industry jargon and what it really means.

Flashing

In the roofing industry, flashing is all about preventing water from seeping into your roof. It’s primarily used to cover joints. Whenever two pieces of material come together on the roof or between the roof and wall, you have a joint. That joint is a spot where water can work its way under the shingles and cause damage.

Flashing is usually made of aluminum or galvanized steel, and it’s a solid sheet of metal that covers the entire joint. On a roof, you’ll often see flashing around the edges of a chimney, around skylights or dormer windows, and in the sections where two peaks of the roof come together. Sometimes minor roof leaks can be easily fixed by adding or replacing flashing.

Drip Edge

A drip edge is a specific type of flashing installed under the first row of shingles that helps prevent pesky critters from invading your attic. It’s installed between the shingles and the fascia, which is the long straight board that runs the length of your roof. Gutters are usually attached to the fascia. If there’s no drip edge installed, gaps can form between the fascia and the first row of shingles, and squirrels and other critters love taking advantage of those gaps.

Ice and Water Shield

Most of the time, an ice and water shield goes under any areas with flashing, and it’s another layer of protection against leaks. During winter, especially in Oklahoma where precipitation might freeze and thaw and freeze again, something called ice damming can occur.

An ice dam is a ridge of ice that forms at the edge of the roof and blocks melting water from dripping off the roof. That means the water sits on your roof much longer than it should, which can increase the risk of leaks. An ice and water shield is a specific layer that helps prevent water from leaking through your roof even if the water stays on your roof for several days.

Class IV Impact Resistant Shingle

Wait... what? Yes, this one amounts to serious jargon, but it’s all about quality. Basically, it’s the best shingle out there. Class IV (four) means that a shingle holds up in even the toughest tests for impact with no cracking or ruptures. What does that mean for you? It means your roof will hold up during severe weather and hailstorms. Some insurance companies will even offer a discount if you show proof that you installed this type of shingle.

Eaves

The eave of the house is the part of the roof that extends beyond the walls of your home. The eave serves two purposes: it provides a bit of shade for the walls of your home and it prevents water from dripping directly around the foundation. The soffit is the paneling that covers the underside of the eaves. Soffits are another place that critters explore looking for ways to get into your attic, especially during the winter months when they’re looking for warmth.

Together, these elements create a high-quality roofing system that protects your home from wind, hail, rain, and freezing rain. We always take the time to explain our roofing systems to our customers and answer any questions they have about the parts of their roof.

If you have questions about your roof or the steps taken to repair or replace it, just ask. We’ll be happy to answer them.

Posted in Residential Roofing       Comments: None

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